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The CCDS Way

Canton Country Day School seeks to educate students through an individual lens, igniting them with confidence and character, while developing academic responsibility and rigor in an interactive and innovative environment.

Canton Country Day School offers children in preschool through eighth grade a solid educational foundation by cultivating an environment in which scholarship, responsibility, and respect for others flourish along with creativity, enthusiasm, and self-respect. Within this stimulating academic environment, the school encourages children, with the support of their families, to:

be active seekers of knowledge;

examine their convictions honestly and embrace them humbly, both in word and deed;

recognize themselves as participants in a common humanity and citizens of a common universe;

discover their own creative powers and labor patiently to surpass ready achievement; and wonder at the mysteries that transcend their understanding and challenge their imagination.

Dedicated to developing character and the abilities to think and communicate clearly, Canton Country Day seeks to fully prepare its graduates to meet the challenges of rigorous secondary school programs and to assume positions of responsibility in their communities.

Adopted by the Board of Trustees on September 14, 2009

Canton Country Day School seeks to educate students through an individual lens, igniting them with confidence and character, while developing academic responsibility and rigor in an interactive and innovative environment to ready them for the next chapter of their lives. 

The Country Day School movement is a movement in progressive education that originated in the United States in the late 19th century.

Country Day Schools seek to recreate the educational rigor, atmosphere, camaraderie and character-building aspects of the best college prep boarding schools while allowing students to return to their families at the end of the day. To avoid the crime, pollution and health problems of the industrial cities of the early 20th century, the schools were sited in the 'country,' where wealthy families owned large homes in what would later be known as suburbs.

The Country Day School movement shared many values with the Arts and Crafts movement. School buildings and campus landscaping were designed with the goal of creating an inspirational atmosphere that would foster learning and culture. In keeping with this holistic view of the student learning environment, various "after-school" programs promoted student development, including athletic programs, choir and religious studies, and monitored study time. Students were given opportunities to develop leadership skills through clubs and student organizations.